Protecting your travelers and your organization

Safety and security is a top issue in today’s world. Discover how to build a comprehensive program in 2016 and beyond.
January 2016

Think you're doing enough to keep your travelers safe?

Think again.

When it comes to safety and security, some travel buyers believe that if they have systems in place to track travelers, their work is done. However, consider the various situations that happen during travel, and ask yourself whether you're equipped to help —24/7.

Traveler tracking and alert content, although essential, is reactive and represents only the foundation of a comprehensive safety and security program. In today's world, travel buyers must do even more — proactively — to keep their travelers (and all of their employees) safe and connected.


How can you keep up?

Aside from your organization's moral and ethical obligations to your travelers and other employees, there has recently been an increased emphasis on legal, financial and reputational obligations. More and more often, companies are being held legally accountable for negligence because courts determine they failed to provide their employees with ample care or information. Companies need to communicate better across functions to ensure a universal commitment to compliance and employee safety and security. By putting health, safety, security and legal protections in place — and by ensuring your processes are fully documented and auditable — you will help set your organization up for success in the years to come.


How does your company benefit from a strong safety and security offering?

  • Improves morale, well-being and productivity
  • Drives positive return on investment through business resiliency
  • Meets Corporate Social Responsibility obligations
  • Decreases legal and financial risk
  • Protects your organization's reputation


3 tips to build a leading safety and security program

If you haven't already implemented these elements, consider working with your safety and security provider to implement the following aspects of a mature safety and security program. If you do not have a safety and security provider, CWT will work with you to offer recommendations for a provider that will meet your needs.


  1. Provide destination information and keep travelers connected

    To manage traveler safety and security proactively, you need information that helps you anticipate potential issues. Depending on the destination, you may need to provide travelers special training or additional security. For high-risk destinations, you may need an escalated approval process, with potential involvement from your organization's security and human resources teams, among others. Safety and security intelligence is the brain behind your communications. By providing travelers with personalized, contextual information based on their itineraries, you'll keep them safe and connected and give them the peace of mind knowing you are watching out for them. It's important to work with a leader in security intelligence that can vet potential crises and incidents to determine what is driving safety and security concerns locally, nationally, regionally and globally — and help you understand how your travelers and operations will be affected.

  2. Provide medical and security assistance

    There is a common misconception that medical and security assistance is only needed during an emergency. However, by providing travelers everything from high-touch evacuation support during a coup to the basic prescriptions they need while they are on the road, you help them stay safe and healthy. Thus, your organization not only meets its obligations but also gains a competitive edge: Demonstrating the value you place on keeping employees safe and well on the road can help you hire and retain the best talent in your industry.
    You might also consider providing an innovative two-way communication mechanism that allows travelers to respond with their safety status when a security threat occurs. When looking at communication options, make sure you choose a solution that is trackable and fully auditable to protect your organization as well as your travelers.

  3. Educate travelers

    Educating your travelers will contribute to their overall safety and well-being during business trips—while also driving traveler satisfaction. Working with a safety and security provider that is a leader in risk management education for travel managers positions your program for success. But travel managers having access to information isn't enough. Be sure you and your provider share travel tips and advice with your travelers to keep them connected, including encouraging them to be aware of their surroundings and potential risks while on the road to help keep them safe.

What kind of information should you share with travelers?

  • Recommended vaccinations
  • Food and water precautions
  • Healthcare standards


  • Country background
  • Potential terrorism and violent crime
  • Natural disasters
  • Driving rules
  • Specific laws


  • Voltage and plugs
  • Currency and exchange rates
  • Cultural tips


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